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The Phantom Family Halo, "Monoliths & These Flowers Never Die"

$15.00

The Phantom Family Halo was formed in 2007 by members of Sapat and The For Carnation. Their debut record The Legend of Black Six was released on limited edition vinyl on Black Velvet Fuckere that year. The CD version followed in July 2007 on Cold Sweat Records.

In the ensuing year and a half, they toured the United States, sharing bills with Acid Mothers Temple, Guru Guru, Hawkwind, Slint, Dead Meadow, The Entrance Band, Black Mountain, Black Angels and many other notable acts.

The Phantom Family Halo has been characterized as being part of a current neopsychedelic movement, but the group’s music travels too far beyond that scope, existing in a world all its own.

Album lineup: Dominic Cipolla (Torres, Dead Child, Sapat) Corey Smith (New Mother Nature) Tyler Trotter (Watter) Tony Bailey (Dead Child, VRKTM, Rude Weirdo, Crain) Axel Cooper (New Mother Nature)

Reviews

“There’s a surprise at every corner. And while the instrumentation can be somewhat sparse and rigid, each movement through the album’s massive 18 songs reveals strata of mysterious sounds, cavernous imagery, and lush evil … It’s weird, and it’s awesome. It’s the heat-induced forest fire ruining the hippies’ fun during the summer of love. Most importantly, Monoliths & These Flowers Never Die does not easily fit in any genre or subgenre, acting more as an anthropomorphic, mercurial, growing beast that is certainly one of the most profound statements out of Louisville in years and, in my opinion, one that holds up well against any given heavy hitter in the experimental rock field.” —The Decibel Tolls

“Titular psych-stormer …” —Arthur Magazine

“… reminded me of the alternate universe where Joy Division joined Kyuss in the summer desert jam sessions.” —DC Rock

“… simply a brilliant, brain-melting slab of acid rock which should strike an immediate chord with fans of Hawkwind and Spacemen 3.” —Brooklyn Rocks

“The sound is totally reminiscent of that 1970 period when no fucker could control the number of overdubs, and these guys pass through every stage from The Youngbloods and Kalackakra to a kind of Amon Duul PARADIESWARTS DUUL-informed take on David Voorhaus’ White Noise project via early (very early) Chrome on their way to the proto metal of ‘Electric God In Your Galaxy.’” —Julian Cope